An organic Xmas? You’re stuffed

WA doesn’t have enough organic meat to go around this Christmas, says a local butchering veteran.

Mondo Meat’s Vincenzo Garreffa says he hasn’t been promoting his organic meats because he doesn’t want to “create a rush that can’t be met”.

“There’s an Australia-wide shortage,” Mr Garreffa says. “There’s a demand for it now that is bigger than the supply.”

His organic poultry comes in from the eastern states, and he’s got a “small supplier” for pork that he didn’t have last year.

Another trend, which he suspects has been caused by job losses and the long-disappeared mining boom, is shoppers being more cautious with their money.

More people are also opting for easier dishes, such as boneless turkey rolls, instead of the traditional bird.

• Beaufort Street’s Mondo Meats owner Vincenzo Garreffa holding a “quintet”—which looks like a turkey but is actually five pheasants in one. A boneless quail is filled with glazed cherries then placed into a boneless spatchcock wrapped in a boneless chicken. This is then placed into a boneless duck, and presented inside a turkey with the wings and leg bones left in. There’s also such as a thing as the “turducken”—a particularly North American tradition which involves stuffing a turkey with duck and chicken. Photo by Matthew Dwyer

• Beaufort Street’s Mondo Meats owner Vincenzo Garreffa holding a “quintet”—which looks like a turkey but is actually five pheasants in one. A boneless quail is filled with glazed cherries then placed into a boneless spatchcock wrapped in a boneless chicken. This is then placed into a boneless duck, and presented inside a turkey with the wings and leg bones left in. There’s also such as a thing as the “turducken”—a particularly North American tradition which involves stuffing a turkey with duck and chicken. Photo by Matthew Dwyer

Whopping $140,000

However, he’s still confident he’ll sell all 500 of his “quintets” ($280 each) before Christmas, fo a whopping $140,000 all up.

“There’s no way in the world they’ll be left behind,” the 50-year veteran says.

“This Christmas has been very Americanised, too,” he notes. “Briskets, pulled pork and spare ribs have been very popular.”

Over at Northbridge’s Re Store, manager Lorenzo Berti (grandson of founder John Re) says many young people are buying ingredients to make their own cheese and bread, and equipment for slow-cooking.

“It’s hard to quantify, but I’ve seen about 20 per cent more younger people coming in getting those things to make dishes from scratch,” he says.

His suggestion for getting a traditional Italian Christmas off to a good start is to enjoy a glass of prosecco with panettone sweet bread first thing in the morning.

Geoff Hodder, who opened the Little Cheese Shop in Baywater in August last year, suggests pairing a foreign cheese with a local drop.

He stocks a wash-rind white cheese, washed in pinot noir from Tasmania’s Bruny Island, which he says could go well with a Swan Valley red.

He has plenty of serving suggestions for beer, too, and urges cheese lovers to seek him out for advice.

Evan Kakulas from Kakulas Brothers has bumped into a unprecedented number of vegans and vegetarians this year. Many are asking for nutritional yeast so they can make their own breads.

He’s stocking his shop with more healthier options, such as organic super foods.

by EMMIE DOWLING

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